fredag 31 januari 2014

Louis Essen: Relativity Not a Theory


  • Louis Essen (6 September 1908 – 24 August 1997) was an English physicist whose most notable achievements were in the precise measurement of time and the determination of the speed of light. He was critical of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity, particularly as it related to time dilation.  
  • In 1955, he developed,[2] in collaboration with Jack Parry, the first practical atomic clock by integrating the caesium atomic standard with conventional quartz crystal oscillators to allow calibration of existing time-keeping.
  • In 1971 he published The Special Theory of Relativity: A Critical Analysis in which he questioned Einstein's theory, which apparently was not appreciated by his employers. Essen later claimed (1978):
  • No one has attempted to refute my arguments, but I was warned that if I persisted I was likely to spoil my career prospects.
On March 25, 1984, Louis Essen wrote Carl Zapffe about Einstein's special theory of relativity:
  • My criticisms were, of course, purely destructive, but I think the demolition job was fairly complete. 
  • I concluded that the theory is not a theory at all, but simply a number of contradictory assumptions together with actual mistakes. 
  • The clock paradox, for example, follows from a very obvious mistake in a thought experiment (in spite of the nonsense written by relativists, Einstein had no idea of the units and disciplines of measurement).  
  • There is really no more to be said about the paradox, but many thousands of words have been written nevertheless. In my view, these tend to confuse the issue. 
  • One aspect of this subject which you have not dealt with is the accuracy and reliability of the experiments claimed to support the theory. The effects are on the border line of what can be measured. 
  • The authors tend to get the result required by the manipulation and selection of results. This was so with Eddington's eclipse experiment, and also in the more resent results of Hafele and Keating with atomic clocks. This result was published in Nature, so I submitted a criticism to them. 
  • In spite of the fact that I had more experience with atomic clocks than anyone else, my criticism was rejected. It was later published in the Creation Research Quarterly, vol. 14, 1977, p. 46 ff.
Louis Essen was the world champion of time measurement and introduced the new time standard based on the caesium clock rate. Essen understood that Einstein's special theory of relativity is empty of physical meaning and thus is no theory.

Essen passed away in 1972, but it is only a question of time before he will be revived and hailed as one of the few leading scientists who dared to express that relativity theory is empty, even at the price of spoiled career prospects.    

1 kommentar:

  1. Contradiction:
    - Louis Essen (6 September 1908 – 24 August 1997)
    - "Essen passed away in 1972..."
    ???

    SvaraRadera